The reference site for Octreotide

Octreotide (brand name Sandostatin, Novartis Pharmaceuticals) is an octapeptide that mimics natural somatostatin pharmacologically, though it is a more potent inhibitor of growth hormone, glucagon, and insulin than the natural hormone.

WHAT IS Octreotide?

Octreotide is a man-made protein that is similar to a hormone in the body called somatostatin. This medicine lowers many substances in the body such as insulin and glucagon (involved in regulating blood sugar), growth hormone, and chemicals that affect digestion.

This medication is used to treat acromegaly. It is also used to reduce flushing episodes and watery diarrhea caused by cancerous tumors (carcinoid syndrome) or tumors called vasoactive intestinal peptide tumors (VIP adenomas).

 

Brand Name(s): Sandostatin; Sandostatin LAR Depot
CAS nº: 83150-76-9
(ock TRE o tide)

 

Product Info

The sections below will provide you with more specific information and guidelines related to octreotide and its correct use. Please read them carefully.

FDA Information

Octreotide was first approved by the FDA in October 1988 for the treatment of carcinoid tumors and VIPomas. In June 1995, it also received FDA approval for the treatment of acromegaly.

Following this, in November 1998, the FDA approved a long-acting dosage form of octreotide, Sandostatin LAR Depot®, for the treatment of acromegaly and to control the symptoms of carcinoid tumors and VIP adenomas in patients that respond to and tolerate initial treatment with subcutaneous octreotide.

A prescription is required for this medicine.

Please visit the official site of the FDA for further information.

Why is this medication prescribed?

Octreotide is a man-made protein that is similar to a hormone in the body called somatostatin. This medicine lowers many substances in the body such as insulin and glucagon (involved in regulating blood sugar), growth hormone, and chemicals that affect digestion.

This medication is used to treat acromegaly. It is also used to reduce flushing episodes and watery diarrhea caused by cancerous tumors (carcinoid syndrome) or tumors called vasoactive intestinal peptide tumors (VIP adenomas).

Other uses for this medicine

Octreotide is also used in toxicology for the treatment of prolonged recurrent hypoglycemia after sulfonylurea overdose.

In patients with liver cirrhosis, this medication is used to help stop actively bleeding blood vessels.

Nevertheless, it is important that you talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this drug for your particular condition.

Dosage and using this medicine

Octreotide is given as an injection under the skin or into a vein. A doctor, nurse, or pharmacist will give you specific instructions on how and where to inject this medicine. Be sure to follow the instructions for the exact type of octreotide your doctor has prescribed for you. Do not give yourself an injection if you do not understand these instructions and call your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist for help.

Moreover, do not use more of the medication than recommended, or for longer than your doctor has prescribed it for you.

Do not draw your octreotide dose into a syringe until you are ready to give yourself an injection.

It is important that you do not use the medication if it has changed colors or has any particles in it. If this is the case, call your doctor for a new prescription.

Use each needle and syringe only once. With your medicine you will receive a puncture-proof container in which to place your used needles and syringes. If you do not receive a container, ask your pharmacist for one. Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets. Your pharmacist can tell you how to dispose of the container properly.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood or urine will need to be tested on a regular basis. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

To reduce discomfort from your injection, take the medicine bottle out of the refrigerator about 30 minutes before using the medication. Allow the medicine to reach room temperature before using, but never warm the medicine in hot water or a microwave.

What special precautions should I follow?

BEFORE TAKING OCTREOTIDE:

Tell your doctor if you have diabetes, gallbladder disease, heart disease, thyroid problems, pancreatitis, kidney disease, or liver disease. If you have any of the conditions listed above, you may not be able to use this medicine or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Octreotide should not be used at the same time as cyclosporine (Neoral®, Sandimmune®, Gengraf®). Talk to your doctor before using octreotide if you are using cyclosporine.

Before using octreotide, please inform your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines: bromocriptine (Parlodel®); diabetes medication such as insulin, glipizide (Glucotrol®), glyburide (Diabeta®, Micronase®), tolbutamide (Orinase®), metformin (Glucophage®), pioglitazone (Actos®), rosiglitazone (Avandia®), and others; medicine for heart disease or high blood pressure; or a diuretic (water pill). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use this medicine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect octreotide. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without first telling your doctor.

Octreotide falls into the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Furthermore, it is not known whether this medicine passes into breast milk. Do not use this medicine without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity during treatment with octreotide unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

Contact your doctor if you miss a dose of octreotide.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Stop using octreotide and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction:

hives
difficulty breathing
swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

slow or irregular heartbeats
gallbladder problems (stomach pain)
pancreatitis (pain in the upper stomach or back, nausea, vomiting, fever, bloating, yellowing of the skin or eyes)
thyroid problems (may be detected by blood tests)
low blood sugar (headache, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, nausea)
high blood sugar (increased thirst and urination; flushed or dry skin; drowsiness)

Other side effects may also occur. Tell your doctor if you have:

nausea or vomiting
diarrhea
mild stomach pain or gas
constipation
pain or irritation where you injected the medication

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What storage conditions are needed for this medicine?

Store this medication in the refrigerator, protected from light. Do not allow the medication to freeze. The Sandostatin LAR Depot® kit should be kept at room temperature for 30 to 60 minutes before mixing the medicine.

Throw away any medicine left in the bottle after 14 days of use, and start a new bottle. If you have any doubts, please talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of an emergency/overdose

In the case of a suspected overdose, call your local poison control center on 1-800-222-1222. However, if the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, please call the local emergency services on 911.

Symptoms of a octreotide overdose have not been reported, therefore an overdose of octreotide is unlikely to threaten a perosn’s life.

Product Images

PICTURES OF OCTREOTIDE PRODUCTS

Below you will find images and specific information on the principal types of octreotide that exist, including their respective brand name(s), strength, inscription codes, manufacturers and/or distributors.

The information below includes general information and guidelines for patients taking this medication and should never be used to substitute professional medical advice that can be provided by a qualified physician or family doctor.

Name: SANDOSTATIN LAR DEPOT®
Strength(s): 20 mg
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN LAR DEPOT INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

Name: SANDOSTATIN LAR DEPOT®
Strength(s): 30 mg
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN LAR DEPOT INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

Name: OCTREOTIDE ACETATE
Strength(s): 50 mcg/mL
Imprint: OCTREOTIDE ACETATE INJECTION
Manufacturer: BEDFORD LABS.

Name: SANDOSTATIN®
Strength(s): 50 mcg/mL
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

 

Name: SANDOSTATIN®
Strength(s): 100 mcg/mL
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

Name: SANDOSTATIN®
Strength(s): 200 mcg/mL
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

Name: SANDOSTATIN®
Strength(s): 200 mcg/mL
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

Name: SANDOSTATIN®
Strength(s): 1000 mcg/mL
Imprint: SANDOSTATIN INJECTION
Manufacturer: NOVARTIS

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